News

WWII Tower Could Be Beach Attraction

November 25, 2016

By Molly Murray
Photo Credit: Chuck Snyder/Special to the News Journal - When Ernie Felici looks at the rebar-enforced concrete towers that dot Coastal Highway between Dewey Beach and Fenwick Island, he sees an opportunity.

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Two Groups Pledge to "Save The Tower"

November 14, 2016

By Madeleine Overturf
DEWEY BEACH, Del. - A silent reminder of World War Two, eleven concrete towers line Delaware's coast. The towers were put in place so soldiers inside could watch for Nazi boats offshore. But according to Dr. Gary Wray with the Ft. Miles Historical Association, most people don't know that.

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Update on the Fire Control Tower #3 Restoration Project

August 8, 2016

The Delaware Seashore Preservation Foundation is a non-profit friends’ organization created to preserve, protect, and enhance the Indian River Life Saving Station, and the Parks within the Delaware Seashore State Park Region including the Indian River Marina, Delaware Seashore, Fenwick Island, and Holt Landing State Parks.
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Groups Look to Save WWII Towers

August 1, 2016

Along the Delaware coast stands a series of watchtowers that helped protect the United States during World War II. They were used to look for enemy ships and, if any had been spotted, the crews within the towers would have alerted the Army at Fort Miles to defend the shore.
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Tower Restoration

February 17, 2011

It all began, Gary Wray says, with members of a couple coastal Sussex County organizations tossing around ideas about how to promote understanding of World War II. Folks in the Fort Miles Historical Association, of which he is president, and their counterparts in the Delaware Seashore Preservation Foundation talked of creating a memorial to that conflict’s veterans.
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Tower Restoration Plans Unveiled

February 17, 2011

Soon, visitors to the Delaware shore and locals who travel Route 1 will no longer have to wonder from afar about the famous towers that stand along the coastline — at least, not if the Delaware Seashore Preservation Foundation (DSPF) and Fort Miles Historical Association (FMHA) have their way.

The two groups announced on Wednesday their plans to restore Fire Control Tower No. 3, the southernmost tower of two located just south of Dewey Beach, in Delaware Seashore State Park. Their project, with a fundraising goal of $500,000, aims to restore Tower No. 3 to its World War II condition, open it to the general public and create a related database listing World War II veterans and donors to the project. "It's a milestone for this organization," said Ernie Felici, chairman of the DSPF.
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Groups Combine To Save Tower

February 17, 2011

For more than 65 years 11 silent sentinels have guarded the coast. Most people are not aware of the unique history surrounding the fire-control towers assigned to Fort Miles; many are under the mistaken impression they were gun emplacements. Two volunteer organizations are joining forces to open a tower in Dewey Beach in an effort to educate the public about the critical role they played during World War II.

The tower will be restored to its World War II condition and be open for tours. In addition, it will serve as a location for a World War II memorial to store a database listing World War II veterans as part of an interactive display. The only tower now open to the public is the 75-foot tower in Cape Henlopen State Park.
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Groups Combine To Save A Silent Sentinel

February 17, 2011

The tower will be restored to its World War II condition and be open for tours. In addition, it will serve as a location for a World War II memorial to store a database listing World War II veterans as part of an interactive display. The only tower now open to the public is the 75-foot tower in Cape Henlopen State Park. The tower is in good shape, said Gary Wray, president of the Fort Miles Historical Association. “The tower is about 99 percent the way it was when it was built in 1942,” Wray said.  
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Groups Plan To Refurbish WWII Gunnery Tower

February 17, 2011

Two resort-area preservation groups have joined forces to raise money for restoration of one of two World War II fire control towers just south of Dewey Beach, which they want to open to the public.

The view from 64 feet above sea level should be spectacular because from the top, people can see 14 1/2 miles east over the Atlantic Ocean, said Gary Wray, president of the Fort Miles Historical Association, one of the groups involved in the project. To the west is Rehoboth Bay. Wray's group has joined the Delaware Seashore Preservation Foundation to raise money and begin tower restoration.
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What Are Those Towers Along The Coast?

February 17, 2011

Perhaps the most intriguing landmarks on the southern Delaware coast are the World War II observation towers. The cylindrical concrete towers were erected by the Army during World War II to watch for Nazi ships and submarines. Eleven towers dot the coast, stretching from Fenwick Island northward to Cape Henlopen.

Currently, only one tower is open to the public. Located at Cape Henlopen, the tower offers spectacular views of the coast. Through a partnership between the Delaware Seashore Preservation Foundation and The Fort Miles Historical Association, efforts are currently underway to restore Tower #3, located within the Delaware Seashore State Park on Route 1, just south of Dewey Beach. Once Tower #3 is restored it will be open to public and interpretive tours will be given.